Posts Tagged ‘Sixpence None The Richer’

EP Review: J.P. Harris (with Nikki Lane, Kristina Murray, Kelsey Waldon and Leigh Nash) – ‘Why Don’t We Duet In The Road’

March 7, 2017

J.P. Harris

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Why Don’t We Duet In The Road

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J.P. Harris, whose sound is described as ‘booming hippie-friendly honky-tonk,’ found the inspiration for Why Don’t We Duet In The Road in the collaborative spirit of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s seminal Will The Circle Be Unbroken. The EP finds Harris covering iconic duets with some of Nashville’s most innovate female singer/songwriters, in an effort to bottle his experiences in Music City with a record aimed at prosperity over commercial viability.

Harris hunkered down in Ronnie Milsap’s former studio to record the four-track album, which he self-produced in a single six-hour session. What resulted is rough around the edges, fueled by twangy guitars and a gorgeous interpretation of outlaw country.

No one better exemplifies the modern outlaw spirit than Nikki Lane, who burst onto the scene in 2011 blending rockabilly and honky-tonk. She teams with Harris on “You’re The Reason Our Kids are Ugly,” which finds the pair embodying the spirit of Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn’s 1978 original. Harris’ choice of Lane to accompany him is a smart one. You can hear her ballsy grit as she uses her smoky alto to channel Lynn’s feisty spirit without sacrificing her distinct personality.

The least familiar of Harris’ collaborators is likely Americana darling Kristina Murray, who joins him for an excellent reading of George Jones and Tammy Wynette’s “Golden Ring.” The pair is brilliant together, with Murray emerging as a revelation with her effortless mix of ease and approachability. I quite enjoyed the arrangement, too, which has the perfectly imperfect feel of a band completely in sync with one another.

Harris is the star on “If I Was A Carpenter,” which finds him with the criminally underrated Kelsey Waldon. Her quiet assertiveness, which could’ve used a touch more bravado, is, unfortunately, no match for his buttery vocal. Waldon’s contributions are by no means slight; he’s just magnetic.

The final selection, Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner’s “Better Move It On Home,” finds Harris with the most recognizable vocalist of the bunch, Leigh Nash. She’s best known as the lead singer of Sixpence None The Richer, the band that hit #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 with the iconic “Kiss Me” in 1998. She’s since gone on to a solo career, which includes a country album released in September 2015. She taps into that grit here, and erases any notion of her pop sensibilities, but proves she doesn’t quite measure up to Parton on the 1971 original. The pair had an uphill battle ahead of them from the onset and they didn’t quite deliver.

That being said Why Don’t We Duet in the Road is a fantastic extended play highlighting five uniquely talented vocalists. If country artists continue to churn out releases of this high a quality than 2017 is going to be a very good year, indeed.

Grade: A 

NOTE: Why Don’t We Duet in the Road is offered as a random colored double 7” limited to 500 copies, which as of press time are about halfway to sold out. Rolling Stone Country also has the tracks accessible for streaming, which I highly recommend. The EP is also available on iTunes as of January 6.

Album Review – Kelly Clarkson – “Stronger”

January 31, 2012

Kelly Clarkson

Stronger

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At first listen, Stronger seemed like an album in desperate need of a vacation in sound. But the richness of this project became more clear to me as I kept hitting the repeat button on the CD player.

Lead single “Mr. Know It All” is a sunny and upbeat pop number complete with an infectious beat and charming vocal from Clarkson. It’s one of those songs that effortlessly glides off the tongue so much so, you don’t know you’re singing along until it’s over. Co-written by country songwriter Brett James with Brian Seals, Ester Dean, and Dante Jones, I much prefer the original pop recording over the country one because it sounds more natural.

The dance pop “What Doesn’t Kill You (Stronger),” the second single, also delivers on the charm. The beat and melody are so contagious, you can’t help but want to sing and dance along. In addition, “Stronger” succeeds in taking the proverb that inspired it and presenting it in a way that sounds fresh opposed to trite. It could’ve so easily been caught up in what inspired it, but the writers (Jorgen Elofsson, Ali Tamposi, David Gamson, and Greg Kurstin) succeed in making it an anthem.

Luckily, the rest of the album follows suit in matching the quality of the singles. If you’re looking for Clarkson to build on the success of “Don’t You Wanna Stay,” her duet with Jason Aldean, than you’ve come to the wrong place.  She loves and appreciates country music, but she sings pop music because it’s the most natural fit.

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